Cloud Grid Architecture

by Woody Hutsell, AppICU

Prevent cloud failures with grid architecture

Public and private cloud architectures fail with alarming frequency. David Linthicum, with Cloud Technology Partners, wrote in an article – Bracing for the Failure of Your Private Cloud Architecture – for TechTarget’s SearchCloudComputing that a major problem with private cloud deployments results from reusing the same hardware they used for their traditional IT. Specifically, he comments that “hardware requirements for most private cloud operating systems are demanding” and later that “If the hardware doesn’t have enough horsepower, the system will begin thrashing, which causes poor performance and likely a system crash.

Andrew Froehlich, writing 9 Spectacular Cloud Computing Fails for InformationWeek, extends this thought to the public cloud when he says that one of the three key reasons cloud service providers fail is due to “beginner mistakes on the part of service providers…when the provider starts out or grows at a faster rate than can be properly managed by its data center staff.”

Serving up applications in the cloud is different from traditional IT. Cloud deployments thrive when ease of application deployment is matched by ease of management combined with consistent performance under all workloads. Successful cloud deployments support many demanding applications and customers. With the increasing diversity of hosted applications comes some infrastructure headaches. We often custom tailor our traditional IT environments to meet the needs of a specific application or class of applications.  We know it has certain peaks for online transaction processing or batch processes. We know when we can perform maintenance. With the cloud, success means we have many applications with overlapping (or not) peak performance periods. With the cloud, we may be more likely to see constant use resulting in fewer opportunities to perform maintenance and restructure our storage to balance for intense workloads.

Successful cloud deployments can challenge and break traditional storage from a performance point of view. Traditional storage scales poorly. Whether the traditional storage array uses HDD or hybrid architectures, it will experience the same problem: as the number of I/Os to the system increase, the system performance will degrade rapidly. With an all-HDD system the latency will begin high and rapidly decay; with a hybrid configuration (SSD + HDD), the system latency will start lower, stay low longer but then rapidly decay.  When latency decays, applications and users suffer.

Successful cloud deployments can also challenge and break traditional storage from a management point of view. Traditional storage arrays are difficult to configure and deploy. It is not unheard of for initial deployments of scalable traditional storage to take days or sometimes weeks for the system to be tuned so that applications are properly mapped to the right RAID groups. Do you need a RAID group with SSDs; do you need a tiered deployment with SSDs, SAS, and SATA? How many drives are needed in each RAID group?  Should you implement RAID 0, 1, 5 or 6?  Once sized, configured, and deployed, further tweaking of these systems can be administrator intensive. When workloads change, as is the expectation in a cloud deployment, how quickly can you create new volumes and what happens when the performance needed for an application exceeds what the system is capable of delivering? The hard answer is that traditional storage was not designed for the cloud.

Fortunately, IBM has a solution – the IBM FlashSystem A9000 a modular configuration that is also available as the IBM FlashSystem A9000R, a multi-unit rack model. The new IBM FlashSystem family members tackle the performance and management issues caused by successful cloud deployments. Where the cloud needs consistent low latency even as I/O increases, FlashSystem A9000 applies low latency all-flash storage. Where the cloud needs simplified management, the systems apply grid storage architecture.

It all starts with the configuration. FlashSystem A9000 customers do not have to configure RAID groups, the system automatically implements a Variable Stripe RAID within each MicroLatency flash module and a RAID-5 stripe across all of the modules in an enclosure. An administrator configuring the system creates volumes and assigns those volumes to hosts for application use. Every volume’s data is distributed evenly across the grid controllers (this is where the storage services software runs) and the flash enclosures (this is where the data is stored). This grid distribution prevents hot spots and never requires tuning in order to maintain performance. No tuning means substantially less on-going system management. When the rack-based FlashSystem A9000R is expanded it automatically redistributes the workloads across the new grid controllers and flash enclosures.

When an I/O comes into these new FlashSystem arrays, it is written to three separate grid controllers simultaneously. These I/Os are cached in controller RAM and the write is considered committed from the application’s point of view. In this way, the application is not slowed down by data reduction. Next, the three controllers distribute the pattern reduction, inline data deduplication, and data compression tasks across all the grid controllers, thus providing the best possible data reduction performance before writing the data to the flash enclosure(s). Data can be written across any of the flash enclosures in the system, preserving the grid architecture and distribution of workload. When data is written to flash inside the flash enclosure, it is distributed evenly across the flash in a way that ensures consistent low latency performance. All of this is aided by IBM FlashCore™ technology which provides a hardware only data path inside the flash enclosure during the time data is written persistently to flash. The flash storage is housed in IBM MicroLatency® modules whose massively parallel array of flash chips provides high storage density, extremely fast I/O, and consistent low latency.

Together these technologies are a real blessing for the cloud service provider (CSP). When new customers arrive, CSPs know they can easily allocate new storage to new customers and not worry about special tuning to ensure the best performance possible. When existing customers’ performance demands skyrocket, CSPs know that their FlashSystem A9000-based systems offer enough performance to match the growing requirements of their customers without negatively impacting other customers. And when launching or expanding their businesses, CSPs know that FlashSystem A9000 can eliminate one of the leading causes of cloud offering failures, the inability of storage architectures to scale.

For more information, read Ray Luchessi’s, Silverton Consulting, article on Grid Storage Technology and Benefits

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